My Favorite Picasso Paintings

 

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Sleeping Peasants

Pablo Picasso

1919

 

Sleeping Peasants, 1919, is the most potent of the small erotic paintings that is brilliantly colored. The restless, irregular rhythms mapped out by the contours of the tume scene limbs and rumpled drapery amount to a graph of love-making which has just occurred, while the woman’s thrown-back head and uncovered breast confirm her Maenadic ancestry. The ripe bodies nestled in the ripe crops implying some archaic fertility rite. 

The painting is carefully planned and controlled, and in that sense an Apolline work of art, and makes its share of erudite allusions to the classical tradition: to the Antique (the pedimental sculptures of the Parthenon), the Renaissance (the massive, straining figures of Michelangelo) and modernist classicism (the late Arcadian scenes of Cezanne). 

 

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Women Running

PABLO PICASSO

1922

 

Yes, “Sleeping Peasants” painted in Paris 1919 by Pablo Picasso is my favorite of all Picasso paintings. I came upon it one day at the MOMA, The Museum of Modern Art in New York. I was at the MOMA one night, walking around looking at paintings when I came upon this masterpiece by the great Spanish Artist Pablo Picasso. I came upon this wonderful little painting and was immediately enamored with it, “I fell in love in an instant.” Look at it, it’s absolutely  gorgeous the way the great artist conceived and executed it. The painting is so wonderful, I just love it. Though it’s not one of Picasso’s greater works, and one most people wouldn’t be familiar with, to me it’s priceless. And I couldn’t believe my good fortune when I was given a gorgeous copy of this painting, painted by New York artist Wayne Enstrude. It now hangs in my living room and I love just as much as the original by Pablo Picasso. My friend Wayne captured it perfectly, so Lucky Me.

Also picture above, is Picasso ‘s “Running Women” another Picasso painting that I love so much, that I once painted a copy of it myself. When I was moving from New York’s East Village to Greenwich Village, for lack of space (and Money) I sold it. Sorry I did, and I wish I still had it. Another painting I copied by Picasso was Picasso’s portrait of Gertrude Stein, of which, when Picasso  finished painting it and Stein saw it, she remarked, “that doesn’t look like me.” Picasso replied, “it will,” meaning one day Gertrude Stein would look like the portrait that Picasso painted of her. And so it did.

 

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My copy of PICASSO ‘S “The DOVES”

Painted by Me

 

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The DOVES

The Original by PICASSO

 

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Picasso

“Woman with Artichoke”

 

RECIPE LUCIA’S STUFFED ARTICHOKE

 

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Rene Ricard Remembered

 

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Rene Ricard

Poet / Artist

(1946 – 2014)

 

Rene Ricard (1946 – 2014)  was an American poet and painter who achieved status in the art world dating back to his involvement with Andy Warhol, appearing in several of his films such as “Kitchen” (1965) and “Chelsea Girls” (1966). Well known for his influential essays in Artforum, Ricard held a major role in helping to establish the careers of Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. Ricard published four volumes of poems: René Ricard 1979–1980; God With Revolver (1990), which included his visual representations of the poems; Trusty Sarcophagus Co (1990); and Love Poems (1999), which collected his verse alongside drawings by Robert Hawkins. Ricard’s paintings have been exhibited at Petersburg Gallery, Cheim & Read, Half Gallery (New York), Vito Schnabel Presents (New York & Los Angeles), and the 2011 Brucennial. His work is in the permanent collections of the British Museum and the Museum of Modern Art (New York), as well as the private collections of Brice and Helen Marden, Francesco Clemente, and Andy Spade.

 

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I first met Rene Ricard one night when I was walking home from work (John’s E. 12rh Street NYC) .. I ran into my good friend Alma Marti who was hanging out with Rene that night. I bump into them on 2nd Avenue in the East Village, where we all lived at the time. Alma introduced me to Rene, and we exchanged the usual pleasantries when meeting someone. We were chit-chatting and I was telling Alma that I was flying to Rome that coming Saturday (June 15, 1985). When I told them I was going to Rome, Florence, Barcelona, Venice, and Positano, Rene got quite excited and wanted to tell me all about Venice and Positano, where he had vacationed the previous Summer with his mother. 

Rene told me that I should stay at the Hotel Locarno in Rome where he had stayed. The Locarno is probably the coolest hotel in all of Rome, and is favored among artists and writers, such as Ricard. Rene continued, “you have to go to the Piazza d’ Popolo to see the twin churches of Santa Maria, and go to Rosatis’s for an apertivo. Do you know what an aperitivo is? Just order a Campari & Soda or a Negroni. Get a nice table outside, it’s devine,” Rene said. Well, I would have loved to stay at the Locarno, but it wasn’t in my budget, however, seeing the Twin Churches at the Piazza del Popolo and having a Campari at Rosati’s was, and so I did.

Rene told me a hotel to stay at in Venice (can’t remember) and he told me, in Positano, that I should stay at the Villa Maria Antionetta, whcih was a very affordable little pensione right in the center of Positano, not far from the beach and all the best little trattorias and caffes / bars in town.

Rene said, “go to Bar DeMartino, it’s the best place to go to at night, all the cool people hang out there. And you have to go eat at Da Vincenzo’s next door, their Spaghetti Vongole is the best in the world.” I went there, and fell in love with bothBar DeMartino and Da Vincenzo, and Rene was right, Da Vincenzo was a wonderul trattoria, and yes, they do make the World’s Best Spaghetti with Clam Sauce, I can attest to that.

Rene was also so kind as to write me “A Letter of Introduction” to the signora at the pensione. He told her that I was his friend and would she please take good care of me while I was in Positano staying at her little guest house, Villa Maria Antionetta.

Rene gave me some great advice that night, and his name and the recommendations he gave me for Rome, Venice, and Positano often come up in some of my conversations every now and then. I bet Rene would be surprised, but happy to here of this, and that in this little way, it’s just one of the ways in which the spirit of the poet Rene Ricard is kept alive, though in a way no one including Rene would have ever dreamed. This is just a little story, but I think it is nice, and so I write it.

 

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Enlightenment

RENE RICARD

 

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Bikini Wax?

and I thought they waxed the

Surf – Board

Rene Ricard

 

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blow – jobs 5 cents

w/ Lipstick 25 cents

Rene Ricard 2011

 

 

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Rene Ricard

 

INDEPENDENT :  5 MINUTE INTERVIEW with Rene Ricard

If I weren’t talking to you right now I’d be…

Painting. I’m in the middle of two paintings right now.

A phrase I use far too often is…

“Hello.” I need to say goodbye more often.

I wish people would take more notice of…

My paintings. They do give them some notice, but they need to give more.

The most surprising thing that happened to me was…

That I’ve got a show at all. I’m massively excited and I think Ronnie Wood has the loveliest family – I love his wife and kids, so I can’t wait to see them again.

I am not a politician but…

If I were, I would probably be in Mark Spitzer’s shoes and be impeached. I think the most grotesque thing is they make such a big deal about it and drag his wife into it. People are shocked at all the money he spent – I think it’s good that he spent money on good whores.

I’m good at…

Parties

I’m very bad at…

Saying goodbye

The ideal night out is…

Staying home, as it’s almost impossible to do.

In moments of weakness, I…

Work. My work is all that I think about because I spent so many years not doing anything. Therefore, work pleases me, which is success in itself.

You know me as a poet, but in another life I’d have been…

A rich kid.

The best age to be is…

For a woman, the forties; for a man, the fifties. Women are really beautiful in their forties, and men seem to come of age around the period of their second wife.

In a nutshell, my philosophy is this…

I don’t have a philosophy in a nutshell; I would go on and on too much.

Toby Green

 

VICE MAGAZINE Interview with RENE RICARD … May 31, 2009

 

Vice: What can we expect to see in your new show?

Rene Ricard: There are some new paintings and drawings and I did some collages, which are pseudo-prints. I printed them off the computer and wrote on them and they look nice, very turn-of-the-century, 1890s or early 1900s kitsch.

Over the years you’ve transitioned from text to a more visual type of poetry and communication. How did that happen?

I began adding images because I’ve always liked to draw and paint. And it was hard to find junk-store paintings of the right quality, things that could support some writing, so I just started making the images myself. Unfortunately, people really like that, even though I far prefer just the writing. I’m vain about my handwriting. An artist once called it my “font.” [laughs]

How do you feel about state of poetry today, especially in New York?

I loathe poetry. I just gave a poetry reading, and other poets were standing up and reciting their rhymes from memory. I guess that’s cute, you know, with the backbeat, but I loathe it. I don’t like what I read in the New Yorker. I really like my own poetry a lot and I think that’s why I write it. Of all the arts, it’s the one I know the least about, and it’s interesting that it’s the one I practice and earn my living on. Anyway, yes, I like my own work. It speaks to me. [laughs]

That seems reasonable. It’s better than acting like you’re ashamed of your work, which so many poets do.

It sounds terrible because I have colleagues like Bob Holman, who I’m sure will hate hearing this even though I adore Bob and I like his work. But when it comes down to it, I like my own work the most. I don’t think that I would proliferate it the way I do unless I really liked it.

What about your acting days? Are you up for doing some of that again?

Oh, I was just in a movie that was at that Robert Redford thing. What’s it called?

Sundance.

Yes. So many of my friends are terribly young and do things like make movies. And if they ask you to do it, what are you going to say? No? You’re not going to say no. You know what I mean. If somebody needs an old man in a movie, I’ll do it.

What’s the name of the movie?

You Won’t Miss Me. My friend Ry Russo-Young made it and Stella Schnabel is in it and that’s why I did it. I play her uncle. She won an award for it—the Geraldine Page Award for Method acting. You know, Geraldine Page was my absolute favorite actor and I know all her kids. Seeing Sweet Bird of Youth at too early an age turned me queer. Geraldine Page turned me queer. She was so glamorous. I didn’t want to grow up to be a movie star—I wanted to grow up to be a faded old movie star

 

Rest in Peace, Rene Ricard (1946-2014)

 

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BY HARRIET STAFF 

Rene Ricard has died. The Warhol Factory Member, film star, artist, and poet, passed away at Bellevue Hospital this weekend, taken by cancer. From GalleristNY

Rene Ricard, the Massachussets born artisit and poet was a fixture of the New York Art World since he arrived in 1965, has died. He passed away early this morning in Bellevue Hospital, said the artist Brice Marden, wha had known Ricard since the 1960s. He died of cancer.

“This is an irreplaceable person,” Mr. Marden told The Observer. “He was really something, just on all ends of the spectrum.”

A member of Andy Warhol’s Factory, Ricard in iconic films, including The Kichen (1965), and Chelsea Girls (1966), and even played Andy Warhol in The Andy Warhol Story (1967) alongside Edie Sedgwick. He is perhaps best known for his essay “The Radiant Child” which appeared in the Artforum in 1981 and effectively launched the careers of Jen Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring, and his collections of poetry. The Tiffany-Turqoise volume Rene Ricard 1979-1980 was Dia Art Foundations debut publication.

Toward the end of his life, Ricard was represented by art dealer Vito Schnabel.

According to Mr. Marden Ricard was experiencing difficulty walking and went into the hospital a week ago for hip replacement. “When he went in they found all this other stuff,” Mr. Marden said.

 

 

 

 

Rene Ricard, the Massachussets-born artist and poet who was a fixture of New York’s art world since he arrived in 1965, has died. He passed away early this morning in Bellevue Hospital, said the artist Brice Marden, who had known Ricard since the 1960s. He died of cancer.

“This is an irreplaceable person,” Mr. Marden told The Observer. “He was really something, just on all ends of the spectrum.”

A member of Andy Warhol’s Factory, Ricard appeared in iconic films, including Kitchen (1965) and Chelsea Girls(1966), and even played Warhol in The Andy Warhol Story(1967) alongside Edie Sedgwick. He is perhaps best remembered for his influential essay “The Radiant Child,” which appeared in Artforum in 1981 and effectively launched the careers of painters Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring, and for his collections of poetry. The Tiffany-turquoise volume Rene Ricard 1979-1980 was the Dia Art Foundation’s debut publication. Toward the end of his life, Ricard was represented by Vito Schnabel.

According to Mr. Marden, Ricard was experiencing difficulty walking and went into the hospital about a week ago for a hip replacement. “When he went in they found there was all this other stuff,” said Mr. Marden, who added that Ricard’s death was unexpected. “He was going to be starting chemotherapy, but he didn’t get it in time.”

Mr. Marden, who visited Ricard in the hospital where he was surrounded by friends, said Ricard had been in good spirits. “When I saw him he was really up to it all,” Mr. Marden said. “He was obviously in bad shape but he was really enjoying the company.”

Rest in peace, starlet.

 

More on RENE

Ricard was a frequent contributor of essays to Artforum Magazine, here publishing one of his poems.

CARAVAGGIO & HIS MODELS by Rene Ricard, Artforum November 1984

Trumps Wears Sloppy Tux to Meet Queen ?

TRUMP ‘S TUXEDO a ROYAL FAIL
 
President Donald J. Trump
 
with Queen Elizabeth.
 
And 1st Lady Melania Trump
 
Cover of The NEW YORK POST
 
TRUMP Looks TERRIBLE
 
with a HORRIBLY Fitted TUXEDO
 
“Well it doesn’t Fit.” Who is his Tailor! Does he have a stylist. This is one person (2?) that should be FIRED (just Kidding). But not Kidding about how horrible The PRESIDENT of The UNITED STATES Donald J. Trump looked is his disastrous Tuxedo. “What The Fuck?”
 
President Donald Trump wore a Bad Fitting, horrible looking Tuxedo to meet the Queen of England, Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace in London, England. “Heads Will Roll.”
 
The Queen din’t look so great either, more of a SoSo, which is far better than Disastrous. Melania Trump on the other hand looked great, in both her outfit and the way she carried herself, complete with a nice smile. The President  seems uneasy and uncomfortable to say the least. The Queen looks to be saying, “let’s get this over.”
 
People have been asking questions on Trump’s Ill Fitting Tuxedo, “did you forget you Tux at home and have to borrow a Halloween Butlers Tuxedo?”
 
There are many problems with the President’s Tuxedo, most of all, it’s badly fitting. People have begged the question about President Trump, “he’s a Billionaire and he doesn’t know how to be fit for a Tuxedo? Money can’t buy Class,” they say.
I’m sure this is the  Last Thing the President would have wanted (to Look Bad and be Laughed at), going to meet the Queen and other Royal, to look so bad, in an Ill Fitting Tuxedo, just doesn’t look good. Now all The British Royals, Fashion Mavens, and the World are having a good laugh at the expense of The President of The United States of America, one Donald J. Trump. This is a Major Mistake, and I’m sure “Heads Will Roll” as the British are famous for saying. Quite Ironic, “Don’t you think?”
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRESIDENT TRUMP with QUEEN ELIZABETH II
 
PRINCE CHARLES & CAMILLA
 
 
 
MeTRUMPbadTUXEDOtwitter
On TWITTER
SUNDAY SAUCE Wants to Know
“WHAT’S UP PREZ ?”
“What’s Up with Wearing The WORST TUXEDO EVER
to Meet The QUEEN of ENGLAND?”
BAD TASTE BRO !
@RiotWomenn says on Twitter ” Jacket sleeves & Pants too long. Who knows the shirt sleeve length, since we can’t see the cuff. No pocket square. (Wrong Wrong Wrong & Wrong)
The bellowing “pantaloons” that drape over the shoes. (WRONG)
The bizarrely long waistcoat.  (WRONG!)
I have never seen a person make a white tie & tailcoat look so sloppy
I think President Trump should have asked his son Doanld Trump Jr for Tailoring advice. Notice that Don Junior’s Tuxedo Tails is tailored properly unlike his father’s, which has a waistcoat that’s far too long, making the President look Sloppy. 
ESQUIRE Mens’s Fashion Magazine , says that Trump’s Jacket & Vest were both Too Short, and these are the reasons he looked so bad. The pointed out that U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin’s Tuxedo looked fine. They added, “When you’re losing a game in style to Steve Mnuchin it’s time to reevaluate your choices.” Esquire also added that President Trump should get a new vest, and head over to Savile Row while he’s in London. Savile Row having an impeccable reputation with some of the World’s Best Tailors and Haberdashers who have clothed England’s moneyed elite for generations.
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Donald Trump’s SLOPPY LOOKING TUX
With QUEEN ELIZABETH II
First Lady MELANIA TRUMP
Buckingham Palace
LONDON
PRINCE CHARLES
Prince Charles with First Lady Melania Trump
PRINCE CHARLES TUXEDO FITS PERFECTLY
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GOT ANY KAHLUA ?
The COLLECTED RECIPES of The DUDE
aka The BIG LEBOWSKI COOKBOOK
GET The RECIPE For TRUMP’S
PRESIDENTIAL FRIED CHICKEN
#TrumpsBadTux
#TrumpsSloppyTux 
 

Pizza History The New York Slice

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John Travolta Eats a “DOUBLE DECKER”

One Slice of New York PIZZA on Top of Another

SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER

The origin story of New York pizza starts with large waves of Italian immigrants settling in the city in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. By 1920, roughly a quarter of the 1.6 million Italian immigrants in the United States were living in New York, establishing enclaves in Manhattan, Brooklyn and the Bronx. Such neighborhoods were home to the first pizzerias, like Lombardi’s in Little Italy, which opened on Spring Street in 1905. The namesake of the Neapolitan immigrant Gennaro Lombardi, the restaurant used a coal-fired oven to create pizzas with puffy, charred crusts and a bubbling layer of tomato sauce and cheese that made it one of the most popular restaurants in Little Italy. As if in biblical succession, as apprentices left to start their own pizza operations, Lombardi’s begat Totonno’s in Coney Island, John’s in Greenwich Village and Patsy’s in what is now Spanish Harlem. These are the four acknowledged prewar pizza pillars in the city. (Though none of them was a slice joint in the current sense.)

 

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The Great PIZZAIOLO Mark Iacono

Shows us The Proper Tecnique of Eating a NEW YORK SLICE

Hot, filling and eaten with the hands, pizza elicited breathless coverage from The Times fairly early on, as food writers marveled at the appealing combination of ingredients and convenience. By 1947, the paper was fully sold. “A round of dough is baked with tomatoes and anchovies and cheese atop, cut into wedges, then eaten with the fingers between gulps of wine,” the food editor Jane Nickerson enthused. “The pizza could be as popular a snack as the hamburger if Americans only knew more about it.”

Nine years later, The Times’s Herbert Mitgang contemplated the reasons for pizza’s popularity, writing, “The guess is that a number of Americans of Italian origin, aided by advertising and refrigeration, have made pizza as delectable as such other postwar imports as Lollobrigida” — referring to Gina, the saucy Roman film star. The Neapolitan-style pie became a chic dinner-party staple that could also be supplemented with a salad for a filling, family meal. But one innovation would change how New Yorkers enjoyed pizza forever.

Frank Mastro, an Italian immigrant and businessman, saw the potential for pizza to be as popular in America as the hot dog. He just had to figure out a way to make it quicker and cheaper for both restaurant owners and diners. So in the mid-1930s, he devised a gas pizza oven that maintained optimal temperatures even as the door was opened over and over.

Although it is hard to pinpoint when pizza was first sold by the slice, the introduction of the gas oven with multiple decks gave New Yorkers the option of enjoying a crisp-bottomed slice either as a full meal or a substantial snack between meals as they moved around the city. Pizza shop owners no longer needed to learn how to operate a coal-fired oven, meaning pizza could be made quicker and with less training. By the 1960s, the slice joint boom was on. And it is the slice joint that really turned pizza from an Italian food in New York City into a New York City food — a meal shared across neighborhoods, ethnicities and age groups, equally at home in the Bay Ridge of “Saturday Night Fever” as in the Bedford-Stuyvesant of “Do the Right Thing.”

PRincePIZZAsquare

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My Favorite Slice in Town is Not a SLICE but a SQUARE

The SOHO SQUARE at PRINCE STREET PIZZA is The Best Dam piece of PIZZA

in MANHATTAN , NY

This proliferation was also helped along by the same thing that brought pizza to this country in the first place: immigration. In the ’60s and ’70s, waves of immigrants from Eastern Europe, the Caribbean and Latin America began joining the work force and landing in food service roles, where the barrier to entry was much lower than in other fields.

As one of the standard-bearers of the current slice-joint renaissance, Scarr Pimentel remembers his spot on 138th Street and Broadway. “Kids like me pretty much grew up in pizza shops,” said Mr. Pimentel, whose family moved to New York from the Dominican Republic. “If you had five bucks you could have a slice, a soda and some ice cream. It was a full meal and sometimes the owner would slip us an extra slice or something.” Mr. Pimentel opened his own pizza shop in 2016, the sleek and retro Scarr’s Pizza on the Lower East Side. His slices and pies are made with organic flour, high-quality tomatoes and cheese and carefully sourced (often organic) toppings, but the slice-joint spirit holds true. “Who would’ve thought a kid like me from the Dominican Republic would own a pizza shop in New York City one day?” he added.

 

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The Great DOM DeMARCO Finishing Up one of His Masterful Pies

DiFARA PIZZERIA

BROOKLYN , NY

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John Kambouris immigrated to Washington Heights in 1965 from a small Greek island about 200 miles east of Athens. “I had $10 in my pocket,” he said from behind the counter of Pizza Palace on Dyckman Street, which he has owned since 1979, when he bought the business from an Italian couple he knew from the neighborhood. “They say the Italians bring the pizza here, but we put our culture on it.” In the 1960s this area was Irish and Jewish, he explained. Today, the neighborhood is home to a large Caribbean population, including a large concentration of immigrants from the Dominican Republic. “I love what I’m doing … we’re making pizza that people want and I don’t have to be Italian to make good pizza,” Mr. Kambouris said, before noting, “I’ve put three kids through college off of this shop.”

It’s in hundreds of shops like his around the city, many no bigger than subway cars, where you’ll find New Yorkers shoulder to shoulder, eating slices in near silence. “Teens, Wall Street guys, guys camped out with a shopping cart, a pizza place is the most diverse space in the city,” said Colin Atrophy Hagendorf, author of “Slice Harvester: A Memoir in Pizza” and host of the Radio Harvester podcast. “Inside a pizzeria that dream of diverse New York City is a reality. I think that’s such a beautiful thing.”

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SUNDAY SAUCE

No PIZZA RECIPE HERE

But The BEST DAM MEATBALLS

And SUNDAY SAUCE ITALIAN GRAVY

And BEST DAM PIZZA in Your Life !

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NEW YORK HOTELS

And WORLDWIDE

Booking.com

 

 

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New York ‘s Best Croissant

 
The HUNGARIAN PASTRY SHOP
 
 
 
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NEW YORK’S BEST CROISSANT
 
 
And Its Most Fabulous CATHEDRAL
 
The CATHEDRAL of SAINT JOHN The DIVINE
Amsterdam & 114th Street
 
NEW YORK, NY
Enjoying a Hot COFFEE
 
Or is it a Hot Chocolate?
 
 
Dobos Torta
 
 
 
The Counter-Girls Pastries & Danish
 
 
 
 
The CAFE is ALWAYS JUMPING
 
 
 
 
 
HUNGARIAN COFFEE
VIENNESE COFFEE
c16fa-bookinggcom
NEED a ROOM in NEW YORK
And WORLDWIDE
 
Just Drinking Coffee
SUNDAY SAUCE
STRUDEL at The HUNGARIAN CAFE
 
 
Yumm !!!
 
 
  
 
HUNGARIAN CAFE
 
 
 
 
 
BEST CROISSANT In The CITY
 
 
 
 
Well just came out of the World’s Most Beautiful Cathedral, The Cathedral of Saint John The Devine. As always the visit was magnificent and “Awe Inspiring,” Truly! I’ve been in many beautiful Churches and Cathedrals around the World, not all but many. I’ve been to the famed Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris, to one in Montreal as well, to St. Peter’s in Rome, The Cathedral of St. Marks Venice, The Sagrada Familia in Barcelonam Beautiful Churches in Positano, Vernazza in Cinque Terre, Gorgeous Churches in Rio de Janiero, and even there exist a Beautiful Cathedral in believe it or not Newark, new Jersey. And of all these beautiful Churches and Cathedrals, I’ve never seen any, that in My Mind, is as Beautiful and Awe Inspiring as the Cathedral of Saint John The Divine way up on 113th Street and Amsterdam Avenue in the Columbia Heights section of “Guess What? New York City.
What’s that you say? You’re from New York, and you’ve never heard of this Magnificent place. Don’t worry! you’re not alone.”
I’m sure 90% of all New Yorker’s have never heard of this almost Secret Gem of Manhattan. I’ve been there more than a dozen times in my life, and every time I’ve ever taken anyone there, it had been their first trip and they were all absolutely “Amazed.”
Anyway, I can ramble on-and-on about the place, its Beauty and Awe inspiring Magnificent and you might seem like I’m some kind of nut. That old cliche of “Words Can’t Describe” the beauty of this place may have never run truer. Words can not do justice to the feelings you’ll get when inside. But speaking of Words, all you have to do is take my word and go there. At least once in your life. You’ll be Amazed! Truly!
Now, on to the Hungarian Pastry Shop across from the Great Cathedral. The place is awesome, and without a doubt, one of New York’s Great Cafes, as well of one of my picks for World’s Best Cafes. The place has everything a great cafe needs in order to be considered great, plus one thing many don’t have. They make all their own pastries, cakes, cookies, and absolutely thee Best Croissants in all of New York. OK, they got that, which isn’t a requirement to be in the Great Cafe Class, but it’s definitely a “Plus.” OK, a great cafe also needs a wonderful cozy comfortable ambiance, Great Coffee, a Cool Eclectic Client which includes artists and writers etc., along with a Great Vibe. A must! So yes, The Hungarian Pastry Shop has all of these and in Spades. The place is filled with Columbia and Barnard University students and a sprinkling of faculty I guess. There are writers, local residents, and usually anybody who goes to a cafe, by definition has “Something Going On.” And being a cross from the Cathedral of Saint John The Divine, there are tourists, and let’s Thank God for the tourists because other than the parishioners of the church there wouldn’t be many to admire this Great Wonder of New York. As stated earlier, New Yorkers for the most part, don’t even know this Gem of a Cathedral even exists. What a shame. But the tourists do, more so even than the natives. Oh well.
Back to the pastry shop. It is really a wonderful little place. it’s filled with life. The tourists stopping in for a Cappuccino and some sweets, the students studying and what not, writers writing, artists contemplating, and locals having their daily Cup of Joe. I Love it.
Don’t get to go there that often, it’s so far away, about 115 blocks. I live in the Village, the most wonderful neighborhood in new York, and I pretty much have everything I need there.
But Saint John’s is so absolutely wonderful that I think I should try to make a point of shooting up there once every 4-6 weeks. Go into the Cathedral, feel the Majesty, then bop over across the street for a cup of Coffee and a pastry or two. And listen, “You should too. At least Once in your life!”
 
 
The Cathedral of Saint John The Divine and the Hungarian Pastry Shop are both at Amsterdam and 112-113 Street in New York, NY
 
The 1 TRAIN Station is 2 blocks away, and you can take the C Train at 110 Street and Central park West, about 4 blocks walk. Make a whole day of it. Go to Central Park, the Cathedral of course, You can go to “Tom’s” of SEINFELD fame 2 blocks away on Broadway for a Burger, Breakfast or whatever, and a must visit to the Hungarian Pastry Shop Cafe for a Great Day in Columbia heights NY, NY
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by Daniel Bellino Zwicke
 
 
 
 
 
THE HUNGARIAN PASTRY SHOP
113th & AMSTERDAM

NEW YORK,  NY
 
photos Daniel Bellino Zwicke
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ART at The HUNGARIAN CAFE
“I am HUNGARIAN are YOU?”

Notre Dame de Paris

 

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Notre Dame

EDWARD HOPPER

Paris

 

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Notre Dame

Andre Chapuy

 

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Notre Dame

PARIS

Jean Francois Raffaelli

 

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Notre Dame

Unknown Artist

 

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Notre Dame

In Front of Ground Zero – France

IL d’ CITE

Paris

 

On 15 April 2019, just before 18:50 CEST, a fire broke out beneath the roof of Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris. By the time the fire was extinguished fifteen hours later, the building’s spire and roof had collapsed and its interior, upper walls, and windows had been severely damaged; even more extensive damage to the interior was prevented by the stone vaulted ceiling, which largely contained the burning roof as it collapsed. Many works of art and other treasures were evacuated early in the emergency, but many others were damaged or destroyed. The cathedral’s two pipe organs, and its three 13th-century rose windows, suffered little or no damage. No person, firefighter or civilian, was killed by the fire.

President Emmanuel Macron promised the country would restore the cathedral and launched a fundraising campaign which brought in pledges of €800 million within 24 hours. It has been estimated that restoration could require twenty years or more.

Construction of the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris (“Our Lady of Paris”) began in the 12th century, using stonework for the walls and vault and wood for the main roofs and spire. The original flèche (spire) lasted until 1383, its replacement was lost in a 1630 fire, and a third was damaged by wind and removed between 1786 and 1791; the spire lost in the fire, made of lead-covered oak and designed by Eugène Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc, was added in the mid-19th century. The cathedral was listed as part of the “Paris, Banks of the Seine” UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1991.

In recent years the cathedral suffered significantly from crumbling stonework, primarily due to environmental pollution; for example, acid rain attacks limestone. In 2014, the Ministry of Culture estimated the cost of the renovation work needed by the cathedral at €150 million.

In 2016, the Archdiocese of Paris launched an appeal to raise €100 million over the following five to ten years to meet the costs of maintenance and restoration. At the time of the fire, it was undergoing renovations on the spire, estimated to cost €6 million. Steel scaffolding had been erected around the roofs.

 

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Tiger Woods Wins The Masters 2019

 
 

TigerWoods

Tiger Woods


RED SHIRT SUNDAY

 

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Tiger Woods Fist Pump after making a Birdie Put in 2019 Masters

Augusta National Golf Club

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA


 

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Tiger Woods approaches the 18th Green

At Augusta National Golf Club

On HIS WAY to WINNING

The 2019 Masters Golf Tournament


 

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TIGER WOODS is JUBILANT as he Wins The MASTERS 2019

For His 15 MAJOR GOLF TOURNAMENT VICTORY

And His 5th GREEN JACKET

TIGER WOODS is The 2019 MASTERS CHAMPION




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TIGER WOODS is ALL SMILES

WEARING his 5th GREEN JACKET

As The WINNER of The 2019 MASTERS GOLF TOURNAMENT

At AUGUSTA NATIONAL GOLF COURSE

AUGUSTA , GEORGIA


 

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